Sharon Hrynkow

 

Dr. Sharon Hrynkow is a senior health official whose career and expertise focus on major global health and science issues. She has spent over 15 years working with the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the U.S. Department of State, leading major efforts in programs and policies addressing HIV/AIDS, emerging infectious disease, the health impacts of climate change, global health research and training, and partnership development. She served for 11 years at the John E. Fogarty International Center of NIH, including as its Deputy Director (2000 – 2007) and Acting Director (2004 – 2006). Her efforts were critical in building global health research and training efforts worldwide and in expanding international collaborations to push medical research forward. She envisioned and launched with her colleagues new global health programs and paradigms at Fogarty and other NIH Institutes. In 2000, she initiated a range of activities to foster advancement of women in science in poorer nations and to include gender in the global health dialogue. She remains passionate and committed to these issues as part of broad global health and global science efforts.
Dr. Hrynkow has also served as Associate Director, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, and as Senior Advisor, United Nations Foundation where she examined health implications of climate change and energy use. She currently serves as Senior Advisor to the Assistant Secretary of State, Bureau of Oceans, Environment and Science (OES), where her expertise informs a range of health and science diplomacy matters. Dr. Hrynkow also leads the OES effort to advance a women-in-science agenda through diplomatic channels. She works closely with the Office of the Secretary and the Under Secretary for Democracy and Global Affairs to pursue opportunities to advance women in science and girls’ science education.
Dr. Hrynkow holds a Ph.D. in Neuroscience (University of Connecticut) and B.A. in Biology (Rhode Island College). She conducted postdoctoral work at the University of Oslo using retroviruses to study clones of cells in the developing brain. She has served on numerous advisory boards, including those of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (Chair and Member, Committee on Science, Engineering and Public Policy), Medical Missions for Children, Canadian Institute of Gender and Health, Institute of Medicine’s Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research and Medicine, and the Society for Neuroscience, among others. She speaks and writes regularly on global health and science matters, and is a mentor to many. Dr. Hrynkow has received many honors for her contributions to global health and science, including the Presidential Merit Award for Senior Executives, the King of Norway’s Order of Merit Award, and the Association for Women in Science/Bethesda Chapter Excellence in Mentoring Award. She is an elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Council on Foreign Relations.

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